We're not so different: Collectivism increases perceived homophily, trust, and seeking user-generated product information

James M. Leonhardt, Todd Pezzuti, Jae Eun Namkoong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Knowing what predicts consumers’ reliance on web-based information when making purchase decisions is crucial for managing a firm's digital marketing strategy. The present research takes a cross-cultural perspective and finds that the cultural dimension of collectivism predicts the extent to which consumers rely on user-generated, but not brand-generated, product information when making purchase decisions. Extending research on cultural mindset to self-other perceptions on social media, we identify a conditional process by which collectivism influences seeking user-generated product information. Collectivistic consumers discount differences (e.g., differences in lifestyle, personality, or political orientation) between themselves and other social media users, which fosters a sense of similarity with others (i.e., perceived homophily). Perceived homophily increases trust and, in turn, consumers’ reliance on user-generated product information. We discuss implications for managers and public policy communications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)160-169
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Business Research
Volume112
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Digital marketing
  • Online word-of-mouth
  • Social media

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