Somebody That I Used to Know: The Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Social Identity in Post-disaster Business Communities

Jenni Dinger, Michael Conger, David Hekman, Carla Bustamante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The frequency and severity of natural disasters and extreme weather events are increasing, taking a dramatic economic and relational toll on the communities they strike. Given the critical role that entrepreneurship plays in a community’s viability, it is necessary to understand how small business owners respond to these events and move forward over time. This study explores the long-term dynamics and trajectory of individuals within the broader business community following a natural disaster, paying particular attention to the influence of social identity. Results suggest that the community identity changes over the course of recovery and rebuilding, underscoring the need for a holistic approach so that intervening agencies can achieve the sustainable economic recovery desired.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-141
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume166
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Community
  • Crises
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Natural disaster
  • Social identity

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