How national context moderates the impact of family-supportive supervisory behavior on job performance and turnover intentions

Mireia Las Heras, Spela Trefalt, Pablo Ignacio Escribano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this study was to examine how national context moderates the impact of family supportive supervisory behavior (FSSB) on employee’s job performance and turnover intentions. The authors consider direct and indirect (through work–family positive spillover) effects of FSSB. Our model is based on conservation of resources (COR) theory and boundary theory. The authors conceptualize national context as contributing resources to or threatening with loss of resources for individuals. To test the model, the authors use data from three Latin American countries – Brazil, Chile and Ecuador. Design/methodology/approach – This is a cross-sectional study based on a survey of almost 988 individuals. The authors first test the direct and indirect effects (via bi-directional positive spillover) of FSBB on performance and turnover intentions without considering the moderating effects of national context (mediation analysis). Then, the authors test the effect of national context in our baseline model by conducting a moderation analysis of direct and indirect effects. The authors use seemingly unrelated regressions and account for control variables and country-level effects. Findings – The results confirm that national context affects the relationships between FSSB and outcomes. As unemployment rises, the effect of FSSB on turnover intentions is stronger and the effect of FSSB on performance, via bi-directional work–family positive spillover, is stronger. When social expenditures increase, the relationship between FSSB and performance via work–family positive spillover becomes weaker. In addition, the authors find some unexpected results. Originality/value – The authors advance the understanding of how national context affects the impact of FSSB on outcomes, specifically in Latin America. The authors conceptualize national context as providing or threatening individuals’ resources, using publicly available data on unemployment and social expenditures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-82
Number of pages28
JournalManagement Research
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jun 2015

Keywords

  • Brazil
  • Chile
  • Ecuador
  • Family-friendly policy
  • National differences

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