Comparative population genetics of congeneric limpets across a biogeographic transition zone reveals common patterns of genetic structure and demographic history

Lívia Peluso, Bernardo R. Broitman, Marco A. Lardies, Roberto F. Nespolo, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The distribution of genetic diversity is often heterogeneous in space, and it usually correlates with environmental transitions or historical processes that affect demography. The coast of Chile encompasses two biogeographic provinces and spans a broad environmental gradient together with oceanographic processes linked to coastal topography that can affect species' genetic diversity. Here, we evaluated the genetic connectivity and historical demography of four Scurria limpets, S. scurra, S. variabilis, S. ceciliana and S. araucana, between ca. 19° S and 53° S in the Chilean coast using genome-wide SNPs markers. Genetic structure varied among species which was evidenced by species-specific breaks together with two shared breaks. One of the shared breaks was located at 22–25° S and was observed in S. araucana and S. variabilis, while the second break around 31–34° S was shared by three Scurria species. Interestingly, the identified genetic breaks are also shared with other low-disperser invertebrates. Demographic histories show bottlenecks in S. scurra and S. araucana populations and recent population expansion in all species. The shared genetic breaks can be linked to oceanographic features acting as soft barriers to dispersal and also to historical climate, evidencing the utility of comparing multiple and sympatric species to understand the influence of a particular seascape on genetic diversity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3812-3825
Number of pages14
JournalMolecular Ecology
Volume32
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chile
  • RADseq
  • Scurria
  • Southeastern Pacific
  • intertidal
  • rocky shores

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